Skip to main content









Series Archive

AIML: Big Changes, Big Conversations

Matt Saiia's picture
Matt Saiia
Wednesday, December 21, 2016
Final Reflections
Why is Collective Next involved in conversations about Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning (AIML)? The answer is simple: We care about facilitating meaningful change. We know that the difference between human thriving and human struggles often rests upon the level of intentionality that we bring to our encounters with profound transition. As we look to the future, AIML stands out to us as a space of revolutionary change—with equal parts promise and uncertainty.
More
Marsha Dunn's picture
Marsha Dunn
Monday, December 5, 2016
Interview
Katherine Gorman is a Podcast Producer at Collective Next and one of the founders of the popular show Talking Machines, which she co-hosts with former Harvard Professor Ryan Adams. While not a scientist herself, Katherine has long been fascinated by the topic of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning (AIML) and wanted to create a forum for conversing with experts in the field. One of her goals has been to broaden the conversation about AIML and the show is notable for having “human conversation” about this highly technical material.
More
Marsha Dunn's picture
Marsha Dunn
Wednesday, November 16, 2016
Interview
We recently had the pleasure of working with John C. Havens at Innotribe at Sibos 2016. John is an author and speaker focused on emerging technology and human well-being. His latest book, Heartificial Intelligence, argues that the “technological pinnacle” reached through the creation of intelligent machines requires us to “elevate the quest to honor humanity and to best define how AI can evolve it.” I had the opportunity to speak with John shortly after he presented at Sibos.
More
Marsha Dunn's picture
Marsha Dunn
Thursday, November 3, 2016
Interview
Collective Next recently had the pleasure of working with Michell Zappa at Innotribe at Sibos in Geneva. Michell is a technology thinker, information designer, self-proclaimed futurist, and founder of Envisioning, a virtual research institute. During his presentation in Geneva, he shared a Paul Graham quote, “When experts are wrong, it's often because they're experts on an earlier version of the world.” Far from being an expert on an outdated era, Michell has dedicated himself to finding ways to envision our technology rich future. I had an opportunity to speak with him in-depth just after his return from Switzerland.
More
Collective Next's picture
Collective Next
Thursday, October 20, 2016
Perspectives
Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning (AIML) are complex topics that appear daunting—even threatening—to most of us. So how do we begin to build our collective understanding of this field? And once we do, once we move from haze and hype to information and insight, what are the actual opportunities and threats we will find ourselves grappling with?
More
Marsha Dunn's picture
Marsha Dunn
Thursday, October 6, 2016
Think Piece
"AI is the new electricity.” So stated artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) expert Andrew Ng during MIT’s EmTech Digital Conference this year. Electricity, as a commodity, was initially perceived as an additive ingredient that might contribute to incremental change, observes Ng. In retrospect, of course, we know it “transformed everything.” Ng gives two quick examples of the “unexpected ramifications” of electricity: electric refrigeration, which (no big deal) “changed the entire food supply chain system”; and electric motors, which (casually) revolutionized virtually every form of human industry.
More

Leading by Listening

Marsha Dunn's picture
Marsha Dunn
Wednesday, October 12, 2016
Interview
Somi Kim knows how to listen on a scale that most of us can only wonder at. As Senior Director of Healthcare Solutions at Johnson & Johnson Design, listening and responding to the needs of a diverse set of internal and external stakeholders is central to Somi’s role. She generously agreed to speak with us about the unique insights she has gleaned over the years.
More
Collective Next's picture
Collective Next
Wednesday, September 28, 2016
Perspective
The image of a patient lying on a couch while his or her therapist nods and listens intently is commonplace. But what do these “masters of listening” really do? What secrets have they unlocked about how to listen in an intentional way, in a way that goes below the surface and serves the listener’s needs? Collective Next’s Mason Smith recently had an opportunity to ask just these sorts of questions when he spoke with Claire Fialkov, Ph.D., a psychologist, consultant, and Associate Professor at William James College. Dr. Fialkov has been in the field for over 25-years working with individuals and organizations.
More
Kristen Bailey's picture
Kristen Bailey
Thursday, September 22, 2016
Perspective
People want to be heard. Just look at Facebook or Twitter. People are sharing everything from pictures of their cat to tips on solving the world’s most intractable problems. But being heard in a business setting can be much harder. Discomfort, insecurity, and outright fear stand in the way. What if my idea is stupid or unclear? What if it goes against popular opinion or the view of my boss? Often times, people are so siloed within their organizations and focused on their own individual work that they don’t have the opportunity to engage in a conversation or share their ideas.
More
Rachael Maggiani's picture
Rachael Maggiani
Thursday, September 15, 2016
Perspective
An effective strategy for amplification of female voices among presidential staffers has been trending this week, along with some interesting research on gendered listening and unconscious bias. I have been leaning in to hear these perspectives and thinking of “my girls” from Girls Rock Campaign Boston (GRCB). It is well documented that as girls grow up they are socialized to become quieter than boys—in volume and in the amount of talking that they do. Girls are less likely to speak up during class, whether it’s to answer a math question or give an opinion on a book. When girls (and women alike) do share, they are more likely to use qualifiers, beginning a sentence with “I just think” or “Sorry, but…”.
More

Pages