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Geoff Amidei's picture
Geoff Amidei
Friday, January 7, 2011
Insights
In a recent post, I asserted that passion is necessary for applied collaboration at its best. Passion is part of the fuel and spirit of good collaboration, one of the reasons that applied collaboration can render such valuable results. Handled correctly, people’s passions—about a new idea, a new direction, or a new way of doing things—can be a positive force, providing energy and momentum, attracting energy and interest, and driving commitment. But like any volatile...
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Friday, December 24, 2010
Uncategorized
In the December 19th Boston Sunday Globe Carolyn Johnson profiles some recent work in the realm of collective intelligence.  As practitioners in the field of collaborative design this supports some of our fundamental beliefs about the creation, or co-creation, of work by leveraging the group’s collective intelligence more than any one  individual’s intelligence. A few nuggets:The sum is greater than any one individual’s intelligence – no star power...
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Geoff Amidei's picture
Geoff Amidei
Friday, December 17, 2010
Insights
Collaboration. Maybe you are one of the lucky few who, when you hear the word “collaboration,” flushes with pleasant memories of intellectual give and take, flashes of insight, spontaneous song, and creative sparks dancing, zipping and zinging from cranium to cranium (nearly visible to the naked collaborative eye) until they combine and explode into a starburst of instant beauty and lasting value.
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Mike LaRhette
Friday, December 3, 2010
Insights
Either you could do it or you couldn’t – simple as that. Maybe you happened upon the six sides in alignment once or twice but weren’t sure how you got there. You most assuredly achieved one-sided alignment in a relatively short period of time but perhaps gave up the rest after 20 minutes of frustrated twisting and turning. Regardless, the Rubik’s Cube, invented by a Hungarian named Erno Rubik in 1974, captured the minds (and time) of people around the world in the dogged pursuit of its solution. While the puzzle itself has seen its popularity rise and fall, mostly in the mid 1980’s, the lessons embedded in its engineering design, its ‘problem’, and ultimately its almost unattainable solution makes it a great analogy for organizational development today, 36 years after its launch.
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Kathy Clemons's picture
Saturday, November 13, 2010
Uncategorized
In another great post, Jonah Lehrer explores The Cognitive Cost of Expertise. Through a process called "chunking," we use our expertise and knowledge as a lens; it helps us quickly recognize patterns within our field of expertise. But that same ability creates a strong bias--we're always trying to fit the patterns we see into our existing models.It makes me think about creativity. Is there something about a creative person's "chunking" ability that lets them see...
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Hamilton Ray's picture
Friday, November 19, 2010
Uncategorized
In "Why Face to Face Meetings Matter," Professor Richard D. Arvey cites numerous studies to make his case. While there is an obvious need to control costs in the face of almost constant meetings, there will always be situations where the effectiveness of meeting in person outweighs the cost savings of meeting virtually.Granted, the tools for virtual collaboration have grown leaps and bounds in recent years, but I strongly believe that there are benefits of meeting...
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Kathy Clemons's picture
Friday, November 12, 2010
Uncategorized
The Europeans love football. Working with a client in Europe, I’ve had the opportunity to listen to two big football personalities give keynote addresses. This week, it was Andy Roxburgh, a former Scottish player and coach, and currently UEFA’s Technical Director.  The focus of our session was competitive thinking—creating a clear understanding of the breadth of the competitive field, understanding what kinds of moves the competition could make, and determining...
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Kristen Bailey's picture
Friday, November 5, 2010
Uncategorized
Last summer I was lucky enough to hear Jack Welch present a keynote address in Boston. It was an incredible opportunity to learn from a true business legend and try to connect his perspectives to my own experiences. I was awed by his immense presence, his command of the room and his apparent stature (he loomed fairly large for a relatively short person). And at the same time, I was interested  to hear him speak so simply and concisely. He was matter of fact and...
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Geoff Amidei's picture
Tuesday, October 26, 2010
Uncategorized
As we enter into the online conversation in a more deliberate way, it’s possible, nay, likely, someone out there will disagree with something we put in here. I like a good argument as much as the next person, but let’s face it, we want to keep things civil. And now it’s a little easier thanks to a new info graphic from designer Craig Ward, who has reinterpreted "Paul Graham’s 2008 essay 'How to Disagree,' a primer for Internet commenters and bloggers on the...
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